Time Freedom: How to Get a Life (That’s Worth Living)

Writing by Conni Biesalski | 
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{This is Part I of The Freedom Series.}

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I believe in time freedom for everyone in whatever we do.
You should too.

Embracing freedom means taking control of your life.

Which leads to new sense of freedom. Aliveness and satisfaction naturally emerge.

Time is the number one thing that people want more of in their lives – even more important than both money and sex.

How’s your time going in life?

Do you feel you have enough?

Do you do all the things you want and love to do?

Don’t you hate it when someone or something else (your job, your partner, your parents, the airline etc.) controls how you spend your time? 

Shouldn’t you be able to spend every single minute of every single day according to how you desire it? 

I SAY HELL YEAH!!

 

What is Time Freedom, Like, Really?

Time freedom is the freedom to decide what you want to do with your time. You know, those 24 hours in a day. Imagine they all belong to you, every day. And no one, especially not your boss, tells you how much time to devote to something. You’re the only one deciding.

 

Ultimate Time Freedom Allows You to

  • wake up in the morning without an alarm clock and decide if you want to get up now, or turn around to dose off again or have sex with your beautiful partner next to you (or yourself, of course). 
  • decide how much time you want to spend on having breakfast and getting ready. Read a book for a couple hours while having coffee in pyjamas or a long hot bath while reading the newspaper? Up to you.
  • decide whatever comes next. Do some work and make some money? Be really productive and do it in 2-3 hours or take my time and spend 6 hours on it? Your call.
  • have lunch at 3 pm, dinner at 11 pm and go to sleep at 3 am? Why not. Whatever you want whenever you want.

 

Ways That I’ve Observed My Life Improving Since Living Time Freedom (again)

Ever since I have reclaimed my freedom after leaving my longest job of 8 months (!) a couple weeks back, I realised that the best part about it, is having reclaimed my time. It’s the best freedom. 

I decide every part of my day, no one else. If I want to work weekends, I do it because I want to. I would never have done work on a Saturday for any job I ever had before.

No wonder, it’s called a FREElancer. I am free to make money when I feel like it. I am free to do the work at 2 am or 2 pm. I decide how much time I want to spend on it. Now, the time I waste is time lost. If I do my work in less time, I have more time to spend with my partner and friends. Now, I can make dinner for my partner before she comes home, and make her happy with it. I couldn’t do that when I worked a full-time office job.

Digital communication makes it possible for anyone to work from anywhere. Hardly any job really, really requires you to sit at the same desk every day. I predict that we will all be mobile workers in the future anymore. 

 

Time > Money

Valuing time freedom means that you realise that money is less valuable if you don’t have time, but also that time is less valuable if you don’t have money. Once time freedom is achieved, a person is free to pursue their dreams, no matter how badly it might pay at first.
You need to realise that time is worth so much more than money and things. Money is worth NOTHING without time.

 

What Time Freedom Means:

  1. Time freedom means getting up when you want, going on vacation or round-the-world trips when you want and for how long you want, spend as much time as you want with your partner or loved ones, eat and sleep when you feel like it, going to the movies or the sauna or the museum on a Wednesday afternoon.
  2. Time freedom means having the time to move deliberately through the world. It means not stressing out and running around like a headless chicken on steroids. Having freedom of time lets you slow down and relax, and let you appreciate life, your environment, people around you and the world in a much deeper way.
  3. When you realise that time is more valuable than money or things, you automatically become wealthier. Time is really what we strive for. And you definitely don’t have enough of it in a 9-5 job. It takes a third of your day, five days a week. In many cases even more. 
  4. It means having less routine and restrictions, and more flexibility to be spontaneous.
  5. It also means you can spend your time doing more remarkable, meaningful things. Like change the world or other people’s lives. It means you can lead a more unconventional lifestyle.

 

The 8-Hour Work Day is Pure Insanity

Anthropologists, historians and sociologists agree that early hunter-gatherer societies enjoyed more leisure time than is permitted by capitalist societies. Aggregated comparisons show that on average the working day was less than five hours.

Thanks to industrialisation, things have changed. For the worse. Eight hours let us be relatively productive, while still having enough time to spend on consumption, which is needed to support a capitalist economy.

It’s all calculated, guys. Henry Ford laid the 8-hour workday on us – for business, not humanitarian reasons. And this is the same for factory as well as office/knowledge workers, shift workers in hospitals, and most other jobs. That’s even more insane! How can we be expected to last eight hours in all jobs that exist under the sun? How can someone standardise something like the 8-hour workday not just for almost any job, but also around the world? People work eight-hour days in the US, in Brazil, in Germany, in China, in South Korea? Impressive.

 

Different Cultures, Different Rules

To my big dismay, there are also countries and many people around the world who have to conform to way crazier working hours (especially countries such as India and Japan) or are not even protected by work time laws at all.

However, on the opposite end, other cultures don’t believe in crazy work hours at all:

Samoa has a 30 hour work week. And the Kapauka people of Papaua think it is bad luck to work two consecutive days.

 

My Culture, My Rules

In my world, I believe that more than four hours of work a day is bad for you. I believe in spending the other 20 hours, socialising and spending time with family and friends, enjoying the outside and nature, being creative or in learning mode, exercise your body and mind and, of course, resting and enjoying life!

 

So do we really need defined working hours? 

I feel like it’s a massive restriction in freedom. Most people’s days revolve around the eight hours of work they have to do at set times. Being denied time freedom five days a week is stupid and extremely backwards.

And only a set amount of days we can take off a year? Man, I feel like the corporate world uses us as prisoners and hardly anyone notices it. Take days off when you want! Go on vacation when you want! Wanna go out on a Monday and spend the next day hungover in bed all day? Hell yeah!

Don’t wait until you retire to achieve time freedom. You might no even make it to that point in your life. You might get run over by a car tomorrow.

Break out of time prison and be free. Money is worth NADA if you don’t have time.

 

I really don’t believe in the 9-5. I would advise everyone to quit that BS, reclaim control over their own time and do what they love.

 

Action Steps For You

If you still have a job that tells you when to work, think about how much time freedom you would have without it. Think about all the things you’d do if you didn’t have to satisfy your boss eight hours every day from Monday to Friday. 

How would you like to spend your days? What would you like to do, how would you fill your time?

 

Don’t think about how to make a living. Think about how to make a life.

Make plans accordingly and start changing your life.

 

You Always Have a Choice:

 

Waking up every day without an alarm clock? Priceless freedom.

 

Have a life for fucks sake.

Do you have a life? Are you living time freedom?

If not, what’s keeping you? Let us know in the comments! 

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8 Responses to Time Freedom: How to Get a Life (That’s Worth Living)

  1. Florence says:

    Loved this article!!! I think back to all the times I had a part time job and how happy I was dedicating the rest of my time to err, whatever I wanted, and how happy I was… I lived more frugally, took care of my garden, read a lot more, had stronger friendships, and my family were stoked to have me back after working 40-60 hours per week for 5 years.. I find however, learning to live with less is the key to earning less… Love your words Conni…

    • mouse says:

      I agree with all of this… except that you make it sound so easy, without offering any practical advice. I long for time freedom, but I need to eat and pay the rent.

      Some people have passions and interests that other people will pay money for – i.e. they can make a living doing what they love, because what they love is marketable. Those people are full of advice for the rest of us.

      We can’t all blog for a living.

      • Conni says:

        I hear your frustrations.

        No need to blog for a living. (I’m not making a cent off of this blog at this point)

        We all have a choice. If you think you can only make a living the conventional way that takes up a lot of time, think again.
        You might not be able to change your life in an instant, but you can work on it and make it happen over time.

        We all need to eat and pay for shelter. Don’t use it as an excuse.

        There is always more than one way. Always. Open yourself up to our own personal possibilities.
        Let me know if you have any more questions.

  2. Lonnie says:

    I agree with the principle here. Freedom is high on my values list. My to do list is down to figuring out how to take my Personal Coaching and Hypnosis Practice online. I started by creating my site and writing on my blog a couple months ago.

    I will say it’s just not possible to do what I want to do with all of my time. I have kids, one of which is a 6 month old, and a complicated relationship. No need to get into details here. I’m pointing out that there are real choices and sacrifices to make. I could live every dream I had, but only if I walked out of my children’s life. That’s a choice I just won’t make.

    • Conni says:

      Which is fair enough. However, people get themselves into situations and then they wonder how they got there. We are responsible for our decisions and own happiness.
      Although I don’t have kids, I don’t buy into the opinion that they are responsible for your restricted freedom. I have seen families and couples and single mom’s make it work for everyone involved, let it be going for their vocation or travelling the world. It’s all possible is what I’m saying.

      Good luck to you!!

  3. World Nomad says:

    Sometimes I remember how much luxury it is to be able to spend 99% of my time however I want to. Remember though that telling others about this freedom creates a lot of jealousy if it’s not done correctly.

  4. Heather says:

    Great article. Play more, work smart & have fun.

  5. Uli says:

    Hey Conni !

    I am from Germany as well. I am actually Technician in Landscaping.

    But I left Germany 2010 for good. I haven been traveling around Australia and Asia for 2 years, at the moment I am since nearly 1 year in New Zealand.

    I startet to write an Blog as well , but been hold up to keep writing, because I worked loacation based jobs.

    I had always your dream and now since I found your E-Book and Blog I will definately do the same thing like you.

    We got exactly the same ideas of a life around the world. Time is much more important than materialsism.

    Thanks for that, you will change my life forever!

    Stay in Touch :)

    Greetings from New Zealand

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